(Image: Claire Giblin Forms Passing, 2016, acrylic and mica on canvas, 48x60)

CAPACIOUS

Affect Inquiry/Making Space
August 8 to 11, 2018

About

This conference has capacious aims! In and across the diverse practices and studies of affect, how might we continue to ‘find room’ or ‘make space’ and under what circumstances might such a framing for affect study be problematic? Modeled on the same ethos of community building, mentorship, and intellectual generosity that guides Capacious: Journal for Emerging Affective Inquiry, this conference will be open to all (students, faculty, non-academics, and others) while emphasizing the crucial role of graduate students and early career researchers in shaping the scholarship in affect study.

August 08-11, 2018
Millersville University’s Ware Center
Lancaster, Pennsylvania
capacious@millersville.edu

Make Space on Your Calendar


Mar 15 2018
Papers submission deadline streams or interstices
Aug 08 2018
Opening reception
6-11pm

Aug 09-11 2018
Three full conference days

Registration for the conference will begin April 15, 2018 and is $120 for graduate students if received on or before July 1 ($150 after July 1) and $200 faculty ($240 after July 1). Registration includes admittance to all conference events, including August 8 opening reception, at least one conference meal, and special conference-related activities in downtown Lancaster.

If you are a published in Capacious: Journal for Emerging Affect Inquiry by the date of the conference, your registration fee for the conference will be waived.



Schedule



CONFERENCE PROGRAM

Full Program Booklet (PDF)

Register

Please CLICK HERE to make a payment and register for the conference. Payment can be done via Visa, MasterCard, American Express, or Discover card. If someone else (your academic department, a colleague, etc) is paying your registration for you, take note of the ‘buying for someone else’ option—this will assure that we have the correct name affiliated with the payment. Be aware that registration costs will reset to a higher level ($150/$240) after July 1st.

After paying for your conference registration, you will receive a confirmation email which includes a link to fill out details for your conference badge, make your selection of conference workshop, and enter a few additional details like dietary restrictions, accessibility needs, and preferred pronoun. Please consult the conference website for workshop descriptions and instructor name (workshops will cap at 25 students and are first-come, first-serve).

If you have any questions or concerns about the registration process, send an email to capacious@millersville.edu.

Speakers

Every spotlight speaker at the conference will also convene a graduate student workshop on Thursday or Friday evening of the conference. Every accepted presenter at the conference will have an opportunity to sign up for one of these workshops. Selection of your chosen workshop is on a first come, first served basis coinciding with payment of your conference registration. Most workshops will be capped at 25 students (some perhaps slightly more, some less). Descriptions of the workshops will be posted to the conference website by February 15, 2018.

Marie Thompson
University of Lincoln

marie-thompson

BIO
Marie Thompson is a Senior Lecturer in the University of Lincoln's School of Film and Media. She is the author of Beyond Unwanted Sound: Noise, Affect and Aesthetic Moralism (Bloomsbury, 2017) and the co-editor of Sound, Music, Affect: Theorizing Sonic Experience. She is the academic lead of the University of Lincoln's Extra Sonic Practice research group.



Casey Boyle
University of Texas, Austin

casey-boyle

BIO
Casey Boyle is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Rhetoric and Writing as well as Director of the Digital Writing and Research Lab at the University of Texas in Austin where he researches and teaches on rhetorical theory and practice, media theory, affect, and accessibility. His work has appeared in College English, Rhetoric Society QuarterlyTechnical Communication Quarterly, andComputers and Composition. He is also the author of the forthcoming book, Rhetoric as a Posthuman Practice which examines the role of ethics and/as practice in digital communication.



Eliza Steinbock
Leiden University

eliza-steinbock

BIO
Eliza Steinbock is Assistant Professor of Film and Literary Studies at Leiden University Centre for the Arts in Society in The Netherlands. They publish on trans* cultural production, porn/sexualities and contemporary mediascapes, including articles in Photography and CultureTSQ: Transgender Studies Quarterly, Spectator, Feminist Media Studies and in over fifteen edited volumes. Eliza is co-editor of journal special issues “Tranimacies: Intimate Links Between Animal and Trans Studies” for Angelaki: Journal for Theoretical Humanities, and “Cinematic Bodies” for Somatechnics. Their book Shimmering Images: Trans Cinema, Embodiment and the Aesthetics of Change is forthcoming with Duke UP. More info on Eliza's doings and free to download musings at: www.elizasteinbock.com



Kyla Schuller
Rutgers University

headshot Kyla Schuller fun

BIO
Kyla Schuller is Associate Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. Her book The Biopolitics of Feeling: Race, Sex, and Science in the Nineteenth Century (Duke, 2018) fundamentally reorients theories of biopower, excavating the foundational role of affect and sentimentalism in the management of life itself and its hierarchies of race and sex. Her current book project, Gender Studies After Gender, rethinks the sex/gender distinction in light of the material turn. During the 2017-2018 academic year, Schuller is an External Faculty Fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center. She has previously held fellowships from ACLS and the UC Humanities Research Institute. Her essays in academic journals including American Quarterly and GLQ and popular outlets such as Los Angeles Review of Books and Post Road explore topics including: our affective interdependence with microbial life; the cultural history of cosmetic surgery in the Americas; and Native resistance to the use of the evolutionary sciences to legitimate settler colonialism in the nineteenth century. She is currently co-editing a special issue of American Quarterly on "Origins of Biopolitics in the Americas," to appear in September 2019.



Donovan Schaefer
University of Pennsylvania

donovan-schaefer

BIO
Donovan Schaefer is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. After completing his PhD at Syracuse University, he took a 2-year Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship at Haverford College and participated in the 2012-2013 faculty symposium on affect theory and politics. He then went on to a 3-year teaching stint at the university of Oxford, before taking up his position at Penn in 2017. His research is on the relationship between religion, emotion, and power, with special attention to material culture, science, secularisms, and race.



Jenny Rice
University of Kentucky

jenny-rice

BIO
Jenny Rice is Associate Professor of Writing, Rhetoric, and Digital Studies at the University of Kentucky. Her work dips into public rhetoric, affect, arguments, space/place, and strange cultures. She has published essays in Philosophy & Rhetoric, Rhetoric Society Quarterly, College English, Quarterly Journal of Speech, among others. Her book Distant Publics: Rhetoric and the Subject of Crisis was published by University of Pittsburgh Press in 2012. Together with Casey Boyle, she co-edited the forthcoming collection Inventing Place: Writing Lone Star Rhetoric (Southern Illinois University Press). Jenny is currently completing her next monograph, Awful Archives: Evidence, Argument, and Extraordinary Claims, which examines the strange and the fringe in order to explore the lifeworld of what we call evidence. She teaches courses in argument theory, conspiracy cultures, and rhetorical theory. Jenny lives in Kentucky, but has Texas permanently tattooed on her arm (and heart).



Dana Luciano
Rutgers University

dana-luciano

BIO
Dana Luciano is an associate professor of English at Rutgers University, where she teaches courses in queer theory, environmental humanities, and nineteenth-century American literature. Recent publications include “Queer Inhumanisms,” a special issue of GLQ: A Journal of Gay and Lesbian Studies, co-edited with Mel Y. Chen (2015) and Unsettled States: Nineteenth-Century American Literary Studies (2014), co-edited with Ivy G. Wilson. Previous publications include Arranging Grief: Sacred Time and the Body in Nineteenth-Century America (2007), which won the MLA Prize for a First Book. Luciano is currently at work on two monographs: a history of affect, time, and ghosts in photography (Time and Again: The Circuits of Spirit Photography) and an examination of speculative writing about geology in the 19th century (How the Earth Feels: Geological Fantasy in the Nineteenth-Century US).



Carolyn Pedwell
University of Kent

carolyn-pedwell

BIO
Carolyn Pedwell is Associate Professor in Cultural Studies at the University of Kent (UK), where she is Head of Cultural Studies and Media. Carolyn has been Visiting Fellow at the Department of Gender and Cultural Studies, University of Sydney; the Centre for the History of Emotions, Queen Mary, University of London; and the Gender Institute, London School of Economics. She is the author of Affective Relations: The Transnational Politics of Empathy (Palgrave, 2014) and Feminism, Culture and Embodied Practice (Routledge, 2010). Her new book, Transforming Habit: Revolution, Routine and Social Change, is under contract with McGill-Queen’s University Press. Carolyn is also an Editor of Feminist Theory journal.



Julie Wilson & Emily Chivers Yochim
Allegheny College

julie-emily

BIO
Julie Wilson and Emily Chivers Yochim are Associate Professors of Communication Arts at Allegheny College in Meadville, Pennsylvania where they teach courses in feminist media and cultural studies. They are the authors of Mothering through Precarity: Women’s Work and Digital Media (Duke University Press, 2017) which explores how mothers in the Rust Belt navigate neoliberal precarity through mundane engagements with digital media. Julie is author ofNeoliberalism (Routledge, 2017), an introductory textbook that approaches neoliberalism from a cultural studies perspective, and Emily is author of the award-winning ethnography Skate Life: Re-Imagining White Masculinity (University of Michigan Press, 2010). Their individual and co-authored work has also appeared in a number of peer-reviewed journals, including Cultural Studies, Communication and Critical Cultural Studies, and Television and New Media, and edited collections.



Michelle Wright
Emory University

michelle-wright

BIO
Michelle M. Wright received her PhD in Comparative Literature in 1997 from the University of Michigan . She is the author of two books, Becoming Black: Creating Identity in the African Diaspora (Duke UP 2004) and Physics of Blackness: Beyond the Middle Passage Epistemology (UMN Press, 2014). She is also the co-editor, with Tina M. Campt, of Reading the Black German Experience: A Special Issue of Callaloo and, with Antje Schuhmann, the anthology Blackness and Sexualities, as well as Domain Errors! A Cyberfeminist Handbook, co-edited with Faith Wilding and Maria Fernandez. Professor Wright is currently the Longstreet Professor of English at Emory University, where she teaches courses on Blackness in the African Diaspora and beyond. Her current book project: Feeling Europe: Black Affect in the Heart of Empire engages with travel narratives about Europe written by artists, activists and academics from across the Black and African diasporas from the 19th century to today.



Caitlin Bruce
University of Pittsburgh

caitlin-bruce

BIO
Caitlin Frances Bruce is an Assistant Professor of Communication at the University of Pittsburgh. She has also been a Fulbright-García Robles/Comexus US Scholar in Mexico, and a Camargo Foundation Fellow in Cassis, France. Her research explores how public art creates spaces of encounter in transnational contexts, and draws on debates in rhetorical studies, urban studies, affect studies, critical theory, art theory, and urban studies. In terms of affect, she is particularly interested in the political productivity of negative affects, and how discomfort can function as a political ethic. She received her PhD from Northwestern University in Communication. Her publications have appeared in Text & Performance QuarterlyCommunication and Critical/Cultural StudiesCommunication, Culture, and Critique; SubjectivitiesGeohumanities; and Public Art Dialogue, among other venues.



Zakiyyah Iman Jackson
University of Southern California

Zakiyyah Jackson, Assistant Professor, English, CHSS. Photo by Creative Services/George Mason University

BIO
Zakiyyah Iman Jackson is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Southern California. Professor Jackson’s book in progress, tentatively titled The Blackness of Space Between Matter and Meaning, clarifies the nature of the proximity between blackness and animality in the history of Western science and philosophy and investigates black literary, visual artistic, and philosophical responses to the reciprocal production of discourses of racialization and speciation. Professor Jackson has published work in Feminist Studies (2014), GLQ (2011 and 2015), Qui Parle: Critical Humanities and Social Sciences (2016), Catalyst: Feminism, Theory, and Technoscience (2016)and has forthcoming work in South Atlantic Quarterly (2017).



Workshops



Casey Boyle
Affective Fieldnotes


Print Workshop

Caitlin Bruce
Feeling the Visual: Affect and Visual Culture in Qualitative Research


Print Workshop

Zakiyyah Iman Jackson
Affect, Sociogeny, Blackness


Print Workshop

Dana Luciano
Haunting


Print Workshop

Carolyn Pedwell
Affective Habits: Sensation, Duration and Automation


Print Workshop

Jenny Rice
How Not to Write Like an Asshole: Weak Theory in a Strong Theory World


Print Workshop

Donovan Schaefer
Charismatic Affects


Print Workshop

Kyla Schuller
Plasticity and the Biopolitics of Affect


Print Workshop

Eliza Steinbock
Trans Affects: Dominant Tropes, Minor Feelings and Methods


Print Workshop

Marie Thompson
Confession: Listening and/as labour


Print Workshop

Michelle Wright
Working through race, class and gender in affect studies


Print Workshop

Julie Wilson & Emily Chivers Yochim
The Affects of Collaboration


Print Workshop

WalkingLab

Stone Walks Lancaster: Militarisms, migration, and speculative geology

Friday August 10, 2017 at 7:15 pm
Join WalkingLab for a 90+ minute walk in Lancaster
Meet outside the front doors of the Ware Centre

Queering the format of a walking tour, Stone Walks Lancaster will include pop-up lectures and artistic interventions into the name/place/concept 'Lancaster,' approaching topics from a queer, feminist, Indigenous and critical race framework.

Come prepared to walk with water, and other necessary items. The walk will be accessible on paved sidewalks. The event is free and open to the public.

Pop up lectures by Chad Shomura, Sarah Cefai, Michelle Wright, Dana Luciano, Greg Seigworth, and WalkingLab.


register here

Streams

Stream proposals have now been selected. The twenty-one panel streams for the conference are listed below. Click on the titles of the individual stream to look at its description and suggested topics / subtopics.



S1
The Dis/Ability of Affect


Print Stream

S2
Educating Affects


Print Stream

S3
Unhinged: The affects of radicalism, madness, and revolution


Print Stream

S4
Affective Witnessing


Print Stream

S5
Feminism’s Affective Imaginary: Narratives, methods, time


Print Stream

S6
Affects and Collective Practices of the Undercommons


Print Stream

S7
Gender Feelings


Print Stream

S8
The Revelry of Suspicion: Conspiracy and Affect


Print Stream

S9
Sound in Space: Affective Politics of Music Interaction


Print Stream

S10
Telling Spaces/Spaces to Tell Through Affective Digital Media


Print Stream

S11
Affect and Philosophy: Impersonal Affects as Motors of Creation and Thought


Print Stream

S12
Spaces of Disaffect


Print Stream

S13
Humiliation


Print Stream

S14
Thresholdings: Contemporary Activism and Political Rhetoric


Print Stream

S15
Neuroaffect


Print Stream

S16
For Other Better Worldings: Affecting Ecology, Ecologizing Affect


Print Stream

S17
Acts of Imagination: Writing, Reading, and Interpreting Affect(ively)


Print Stream

S18
Globalizing Affect Theory: Affect, Power, and the more-than Global South


Print Stream

S19
Affective Spaces: Reframing Theory, Praxis, and Pedagogies in Architecture & Design


Print Stream

S20
Haterz and Frenemies


Print Stream

S21
No Space, Mo’ Space


Print Stream

Getting Here

FIRST, PLEASE NOTE: The main campus of Millersville University is located in Millersville, Pennsylvania. The town of Millersville is roughly 6 miles southwest of the city of Lancaster. No events will be held at the main campus. All events will be at the downtown campus Ware Center on 42 North Prince Street, Lancaster PA 17603.

The closest airport to Lancaster is Harrisburg International Airport. There is car rental and taxi service between Harrisburg and downtown Lancaster. A taxi or Uber/Lyft ride from the Harrisburg airport to Lancaster is 32 miles (about 45 minute drive)—cost is $60-75 usually. Not cheap!

We ask that conference attendees arriving at the Harrisburg airport send us their travel itineraries (arrival/departure & flight numbers). On Wednesday, August 8 we will try to arrange free transport from Harrisburg to Lancaster for as many attendees as possible throughout the day. We will do the same on Sunday, August 12 for return to the airport. If you arrive or depart on days other than August 8 and August 12, we cannot arrange for free transport but there is also Amtrak service between Harrisburg and Lancaster. From Harrisburg airport, take a taxi cab or Uber/Lyft (http://www.flyhia.com/taxis) to the Middletown, Pennsylvania Amtrak station (2.1 miles from airport to train station—train ticket about $10, and the train runs between 6:30 am and 9:30 pm weekdays, 25 minute ride).

If traveling to the conference internationally, it is often best to fly into Philadelphia International Airport and then take an Amtrak train from Philadelphia’s 30th Street Station directly to Lancaster. Once you’ve arrived in Philadelphia, you can take the SEPTA train ($8) from the airport to the Philadelphia 30th Street train station where SEPTA connects with Amtrak (http://www.septa.org/schedules/rail/w/AIR_0.html).

Amtrak will get you from Philadelphia to Lancaster in one hour and ten minutes. Amtrak offers eight daily trains from 30th Street Station in Philadelphia to Lancaster: $16-19 for a one-way ticket. Please check http://www.amtrak.com/home for schedules and train information.

Once at Lancaster’s train station, a Red Rose Trolley (approximately $3) takes you from the train station to the center of downtown where the hotels and convention center are located (5-10 minute trip). There are also taxi cabs generally available outside of the train station for the less adventurous. Weather permitting, it is a nice walk (about one mile) from the Lancaster train station—down Queen Street—to the downtown hotels. See https://visitlancastercity.com/transportation/.

Hotels

The Marriott has agreed to extend the discount now up until the time of the conference! So, if you are one of those folks who waits until the last minute, you just got an extension. The deal is you will have to CALL 717-239-1600 and ask for the ‘CAPACIOUS CONFERENCE ROOM BLOCK.’ If anyone traveling internationally needs assistance with these arrangements, let us know at capacious@millersville.edu. (Also, if you booked a day earlier than the block—August 7th, let us know and we can likely get the rate reduced for that night even though it is not in our Aug 8 -11 original block.)

Core Committee

Gregory J. Seigworth Millersville University (United States)

Mathew Arthur Vancouver School of Theology (Canada)

Wendy J. Truran University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (United States)

Bryan G. Behrenshausen Red Hat (United States)

Editorial Board